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gesine@bu.edu

Gesine Meyer-Rath, PhD

Research Associate

Research Associate

Gesine Meyer-Rath is a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Global Health of the Boston University School of Public Health. She is a physician and health economist working on the economics of HIV and COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries. Her focus lies on modeling methods for economic evaluation, including infectious disease modeling and decision analysis, and translating research into recommendations for public policy. Before joining BU she has worked in the Paediatrics Department of Charité University Hospital Berlin and with the World Health Organization. Since 2006, she has been based in Johannesburg, first collecting data for her PhD in health economics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and, since 2009, working with the Health Economics and Epidemiology Research Office (HE2RO), a collaboration between BUSPH and the University of the Witwatersrand. She holds a MD/PhD in Physiology from Free University Berlin and a PhD in Health Economics from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Recent publications

Pearson CAB, Silal S, Li MWZ, Dushoff J, Bolker BM, Abbott S, van Schalkwyk C, Davies, NG, Barnard RC, Edmunds WJ, Bingham JL, Meyer-Rath G, Glass A, Wolter N, Govender N, Stevens W, Scott L, Mlisana K, Moultrie H, Pulliam JRC, (2021) Bounding the levels of transmissibility & immune evasion of the Omicron variant in South Africa doi.org/10.1101/2021.12.19.21268038


Youngji J, Jamieson L, Edoka I, Long L , S Sheetal Silal, Pulliam J.C.R, Moultrie H, Sanne I, Meyer-Rath G, Nichols BE (2021) Cost-effectiveness of Remdesivir and Dexamethasone for COVID-19 Treatment in South Africa Open Forum Infectious Diseases doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofab040


Nichols, B.E., L. Jamieson, S.R.C Zhang, G.A. Rao, S. Silal, J.R.C. Pulliam, I. Sanne, and G. Meyer-Rath (2020) The role of remdesivir in South Africa: preventing COVID-19 deaths through increasing intensive care unit capacity. Clinical Infectious Diseases 71(9): 1642–1644 doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa937


DSI-NRF Centre of Excellence in Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis